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Homalodisca vitripennis

Overview

The Glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, (Homalodisca vitripennis) [Hemiptera: Cicadellidae], occurs naturally within the southern United States. Once restricted to the southeastern states, it was accidentally spread across the south into California. The GWSS is a voracious feeder, and can fly long distances, preferring to feed upon cultivated crops, ie. Grapevine, fruit trees, and in the nymphal stages many weeds and grasses.

The GWSS is a serious threat to the viticulture industry as the primary vector of the plant-infecting bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa, Xf. The GWSS feeds on a diverse number of plants, during which the bacteria can infect many tree fruit, nut, vine, and woody ornamental crops.

Glassy-winged Sharpshooter adults are ½ inch (13mm) long being fairly large for the Sharpshooter leafhopper family of insects. Sharpshooters use an ovipositor to lay eggs inside of the underside of leaves. The Sharpshooter will lay its eggs on almost any plant including cactus. The egg masses are usually composed of 10-20 eggs, but can lay more or as few as 1. Most of the egg masses have a waxy coating of brocosomes around the eggs for protection. The nymphs (5 instars) do not have wings, but develop wing pads in the 5th instar and are generally smaller than the adults, ranging in size from .07 inches (2 mm) to nearly ½ inch (13mm) long. The nymphs have very distinct red eyes. The Sharpshooter can consume about 300 times its own weight in fluids from the xylem vessels of the plants upon which it feeds, thus producing copious amounts of excreta fluid.

Data were generated by the Baylor College of Medicine's i5k pilot project.

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Image Credit: Reyes Garcia III. CCBYNC3.0. View Source.

Assembly Information

Analysis Name
Whole genome assembly of Homalodisca vitripennis
Software
Baylor College of Medicine genome assembly pipeline (NA)
Source
Homalodisca vitripennis Ssh04282013 assembly
Date performed
2013-07-11
Materials & Methods

Sequence generation for assembly. For this project we are generating fairly high coverage in a number of different insert sized libraries. The assembly strategy is based around a seed allpaths assembly (the Broad Allpaths assembler) followed by seed assembly improvement using homegrown tools, Atlas-link and Atlas-GapFill, which can significantly improve the results. Thus we generate sequence data to enable the Allpaths assembly. As of Nov 2011 this is: - 40X genome coverage in 180bp insert library (100bp reads forward and reverse); and 40X 3kb insert data. To enable better scaffolding and local gap filling we additionally generate 500bp, 1kb, 2kb, and 8kb insert sizes at > 20X coverage.

Source: Baylor College of Medicine i5K Project Summary

Assembly Metrics

Contig N50
4858
Scaffold N50
914009
GC Content
33.34

Data Files

NameLast modifiedSize
folder-parentParent Directory
folderBCM-After-Atlas2018-02-12 17:09
folderCurrent Genome Assembly2018-02-12 17:06
folderGCA_000696855.12018-02-12 17:06